HostUS Los Angeles VPS Review – Excellent Value!

Good morning everybody!

I have been a customer of HostUS for quite some time.

Matter of fact, I signed up for the company December 29th 2015 after seeing their offers posted on Low End Box for their 768mb annual VPS offer they did for awhile which was really competitive at the time.

Fast forward to now, it’s a very solid service and I’m very pleased with everything HostUS has offered me over the years.

I have a total of four OpenVZ services with them:

  • Los Angeles, Dallas and Ashburn/WDC are part of a cPanel DNS only cluster.
  • Another Los Angeles VPS on standby/backup.

I was letting a Filipino friend I went to high school with connect to the LA VPS to allow him VPN access to US content.

To give you an idea, I am paying $11/year for this service I’m reviewing and later on in March 2016 the prices increased to $12/year so I purchased the DNS cluster using the performance and stability of this VPS as a measure. Now the price is up to $16/year.

You might be tempted with all these reseller offers of a certain company in their predictable locations at that price but avoid temptation and go with HostUS.

Anybody can order VPS nodes and offer $11 – $16/year VPS plans. Only HostUS, it seems, can stay long term offering these plans but also not relying on racing to the bottom trying to be the cheapest thing because now that I think about it, they rarely if ever have to advertise on LowEndBox or LowEndTalk.

# wget -qO- bench.sh | bash
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU model            : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2670 0 @ 2.60GHz
Number of cores      : 1
CPU frequency        : 2600.010 MHz
Total size of Disk   : 20.0 GB (11.0 GB Used)
Total amount of Mem  : 768 MB (768 MB Used)
Total amount of Swap : 768 MB (72 MB Used)
System uptime        : 45 days, 0 hour 7 min
Load average         : 0.08, 0.03, 0.01
OS                   : Debian GNU/Linux 8
Arch                 : x86_64 (64 Bit)
Kernel               : 2.6.32-042stab130.1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
I/O speed(1st run)   : 34.2 MB/s
I/O speed(2nd run)   : 31.9 MB/s
I/O speed(3rd run)   : 31.5 MB/s
Average I/O speed    : 32.5 MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Node Name                       IPv4 address            Download Speed
CacheFly                        205.234.175.175         98.9MB/s
Linode, Tokyo, JP               106.187.96.148          15.3MB/s
Linode, Singapore, SG           139.162.23.4            7.06MB/s
Linode, London, UK              176.58.107.39           2.47MB/s
Linode, Frankfurt, DE           139.162.130.8           9.31MB/s
Linode, Fremont, CA             50.116.14.9             20.1MB/s
Softlayer, Dallas, TX           173.192.68.18           47.8MB/s
Softlayer, Seattle, WA          67.228.112.250          63.0MB/s
Softlayer, Frankfurt, DE        159.122.69.4            9.34MB/s
Softlayer, Singapore, SG        119.81.28.170           17.9MB/s
Softlayer, HongKong, CN         119.81.130.170          20.9MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Node Name                       IPv6 address            Download Speed
Linode, Atlanta, GA             2600:3c02::4b           5.51MB/s
Linode, Dallas, TX              2600:3c00::4b           32.4MB/s
Linode, Newark, NJ              2600:3c03::4b           15.7MB/s
Linode, Singapore, SG           2400:8901::4b           7.51MB/s
Linode, Tokyo, JP               2400:8900::4b           11.1MB/s
Softlayer, San Jose, CA         2607:f0d0:2601:2a::4    73.8MB/s
Softlayer, Washington, WA       2607:f0d0:3001:78::2    36.4MB/s
Softlayer, Paris, FR            2a03:8180:1301:8::4     15.5MB/s
Softlayer, Singapore, SG        2401:c900:1101:8::2     6.91MB/s
Softlayer, Tokyo, JP            2401:c900:1001:16::4    6.73MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Very respectable if you ask me.

The Los Angeles location is ideal across all of the US and in the Asia-Pacific region. If you’re in Western Europe, it’s not exactly the best but you’ll survive.

Also, its amazing to see their expansion at the following locations below:

  • Charlotte, USA
  • Atlanta, USA
  • Dallas, USA
  • Los Angeles, USA
  • Washington DC, USA
  • London, UK
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Hong Kong, China
  • Sydney, Australia
  • Singapore

At first it was Dallas, LA, WDC, and London.

Next came Singapore and Hong Kong, then all the rest were established.

I have only tested Dallas, LA, WDC and London but I may look into ordering additional services with HostUS as I have a project where I’d need reliability.

-------------------------------------------------
 nench.sh v2018.04.14 -- https://git.io/nench.sh
 benchmark timestamp:    2018-11-17 14:49:26 UTC
-------------------------------------------------

Processor:    Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2670 0 @ 2.60GHz
CPU cores:    1
Frequency:    2600.010 MHz
RAM:          768M
Swap:         768M
Kernel:       Linux 2.6.32-042stab130.1 x86_64

Disks:
Filesystem        Type      Size Inodes
/dev/ploop44277p1 ext4       20G   1.3M

CPU: SHA256-hashing 500 MB
    4.674 seconds
CPU: bzip2-compressing 500 MB
    7.207 seconds
CPU: AES-encrypting 500 MB
    2.061 seconds

ioping: seek rate
    min/avg/max/mdev = 32.2 us / 127.2 us / 12.9 ms / 248.7 us
ioping: sequential read speed
    generated 599 requests in 5.01 s, 149.8 MiB, 119 iops, 29.9 MiB/s

dd: sequential write speed
    1st run:    29.95 MiB/s
    2nd run:    30.23 MiB/s
    3rd run:    30.23 MiB/s
    average:    30.14 MiB/s

IPv4 speedtests
    your IPv4:    104.128.233.xxxx

    Cachefly CDN:         82.96 MiB/s
    Leaseweb (NL):        9.13 MiB/s
    Softlayer DAL (US):   0.00 MiB/s
    Online.net (FR):      2.97 MiB/s
    OVH BHS (CA):         16.07 MiB/s

IPv6 speedtests
    your IPv6:    2602:ffc5:20:xxxx

    Leaseweb (NL):        7.24 MiB/s
    Softlayer DAL (US):   0.00 MiB/s
    Online.net (FR):      7.79 MiB/s
    OVH BHS (CA):         12.89 MiB/s
-------------------------------------------------

I like this benchmark script due to the CPU testing but the network testing isn’t as good. I may fork both scripts into a “vpslist” script.

The disk I/O isn’t exactly the best which isn’t surprising looking at the uptime of the server. I’m sure its a rowdy VPS node with noisy neighbors and who knows running what. As a past VPS company sysadmin, you always have that one node that always goes crazy at predictable hours full of people doing things.

However monitoring on my other services isn’t a problem.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a hosting provider and want reliability but don’t want to go to a “big box” hosting company and want to establish a relationship with a smaller hosting company, go with HostUS.

I am very pleased and it just simply works without any drama.

I am going to pay my invoice for this service I reviewed and keep it going for the third year then renew my cPanel DNS only cluster in March when it comes up for renewal also.

Vultr Atlanta Review – 512MB KVM VPS for $3.50/mo

Hey everybody!

I had to spin up a Vultr Atlanta instance for testing and thought I would run some quick benchmarks on it for everybody if they were curious.

Honestly out of Vultr, Digital Ocean, Linode and countless others, for some reason, Vultr is always my go to.

This is the $3.50/mo 1 CPU, 512 MB RAM, 20 GB SSD, and 500 GB of bandwidth. This is cheaper than the cheapest plan of what Digital Ocean offers of 1 GB for $5. I know it’s $1.50 but you may only want or need this much resources for testing something very small that you may destroy later on.

Just a heads up, there’s a maximum of 5 of these $3.50/mo plans you can use.

I think just having a slightly cheaper option is probably what gives Vultr the slighter edge over the competition when I look around.

A lot of people might not get it but 5 services for $5 is $25 and 5 for $3.50 is $17.50 so if you’re a student, freelancer or startup guy scraping cash together for the next big idea a $7.50 difference can really add up especially if you keep the services up for a few months where a project may not be making money.

Also from a hosting perspective, the resources of these 512 MB plans are more likely to be all used such as the RAM and CPU versus these 1 GB plans for $5 that might idle. If the customer doesn’t have enough resources for what they’re doing, they’re forced to upgrade or optimize their setup. It’s simple.

My recommendation?

If you’re in the market for these specs and this pricing but not sure to go with Vultr or some other company, I would safely say just go with Vultr if you’re worried about a brand new hosting company or even 3-5 year old company trying to compete with Vultr pricing but may not have the experience in server or business management.

Sadly, a “new” hosting company may only last 3-6 months their first year and at maximum 3-5 years long term. It’s just the competitive nature of the hosting industry.

Disclaimer: I don’t have IPv6 enabled because I don’t need/use it, this was just on a testing setup.

-------------------------------------------------
 nench.sh v2018.04.14 -- https://git.io/nench.sh
 benchmark timestamp:    2018-11-17 06:07:42 UTC
-------------------------------------------------

Processor:    Virtual CPU a7769a6388d5
CPU cores:    1
Frequency:    2394.454 MHz
RAM:          494M
Swap:         -
Kernel:       Linux 3.16.0-7-amd64 x86_64

Disks:
vda     20G  HDD

CPU: SHA256-hashing 500 MB
    3.983 seconds
CPU: bzip2-compressing 500 MB
    CPU: AES-encrypting 500 MB
    1.989 seconds

ioping: seek rate
    min/avg/max/mdev = 186.1 us / 254.7 us / 4.40 ms / 70.7 us
ioping: sequential read speed
    generated 2.66 k requests in 5.00 s, 664.8 MiB, 531 iops, 132.9 MiB/s

dd: sequential write speed
    1st run:    227.93 MiB/s
    2nd run:    340.46 MiB/s
    3rd run:    343.32 MiB/s
    average:    303.90 MiB/s

IPv4 speedtests
    your IPv4:    144.202.18.xxxx

    Cachefly CDN:         124.96 MiB/s
    Leaseweb (NL):        15.32 MiB/s
    Softlayer DAL (US):   0.00 MiB/s
    Online.net (FR):      14.28 MiB/s
    OVH BHS (CA):         20.02 MiB/s

No IPv6 connectivity detected
-------------------------------------------------

The stats are very respectable, especially overseas, which is why I like Vultr.

# wget -qO- bench.sh | bash
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU model            : Virtual CPU a7769a6388d5
Number of cores      : 1
CPU frequency        : 2394.454 MHz
Total size of Disk   : 20.0 GB (0.9 GB Used)
Total amount of Mem  : 494 MB (164 MB Used)
Total amount of Swap : 0 MB (0 MB Used)
System uptime        : 0 days, 11 hour 35 min
Load average         : 0.08, 0.02, 0.01
OS                   : Debian GNU/Linux 8
Arch                 : x86_64 (64 Bit)
Kernel               : 3.16.0-7-amd64
----------------------------------------------------------------------
I/O speed(1st run)   : 256 MB/s
I/O speed(2nd run)   : 332 MB/s
I/O speed(3rd run)   : 357 MB/s
Average I/O speed    : 315.0 MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Node Name                       IPv4 address            Download Speed
CacheFly                        205.234.175.175         57.8MB/s
Linode, Tokyo, JP               106.187.96.148          8.83MB/s
Linode, Singapore, SG           139.162.23.4            5.33MB/s
Linode, London, UK              176.58.107.39           14.1MB/s
Linode, Frankfurt, DE           139.162.130.8           12.4MB/s
Linode, Fremont, CA             50.116.14.9             26.8MB/s
Softlayer, Dallas, TX           173.192.68.18           45.5MB/s
Softlayer, Seattle, WA          67.228.112.250          20.2MB/s
Softlayer, Frankfurt, DE        159.122.69.4            6.36MB/s
Softlayer, Singapore, SG        119.81.28.170           5.19MB/s
Softlayer, HongKong, CN         119.81.130.170          6.60MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Again – excellent international transfers and this is Atlanta, Georgia in the Southeast US which by some consideration may not be a “major” location.

I would consider Los Angeles, Dallas, Chicago and New York your primary locations for most providers and data centers. If you wanted to appeal to Southeast US customers or visitors to your websites, you’d want to consider an Atlanta location.

Florida visitors would have excellent connectivity as Xfinity will sometimes route traffic down to Miami then up to Atlanta or sometimes from Jacksonville to Atlanta.

Conclusion:

I like Vultr a lot and will continue to use them. Their support is excellent, for the rare chance that I actually have to contact support. I think it was about the initial limit on my account and having to increase it.

There may be a 2 $3.50/mo limit that you can get increased to 5.

Big Power Hosting Review – Miami KVM VPS Hosting

I found a really attractive offer online from a company called Big Power Hosting who offered the following in Miami:

*exceed 2 TB/mo then throttled back to 10Mbps.

Don’t like Miami?

Big Power Hosting has servers in New York (NJ) and Los Angeles for that same offer.

I thought to myself that’s a pretty attractive offer and even more attractive with the 60off coupon being valid until the end of 2018 which pushes it into a lot of pricing that Vultr, Digital Ocean, Linode, and other “cloud” providers offer.

The CPU on the VPS node is a Intel Xeon E5-1650 v4 @ 3.6 Ghz and 15mb cache.

The network is amazing. I think the node I’m on is idling but I’m using close to full download on the 1 Gbps uplink where I downloaded the 100mb test file at 112M/s in less than 1 second.

CPU information:

# cat /proc/cpuinfo
processor : 0
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 79
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-1650 v4 @ 3.60GHz
stepping : 1
microcode : 0x1
cpu MHz : 3599.998
cache size : 15360 KB
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp : yes
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss syscall nx pdpe1gb rdtscp lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon rep_good nopl xtopology pni pclmulqdq ssse3 fma cx16 pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic movbe popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx f16c rdrand hypervisor lahf_lm abm 3dnowprefetch arat xsaveopt fsgsbase smep erms
bogomips : 7199.99
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor : 1
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 79
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-1650 v4 @ 3.60GHz
stepping : 1
microcode : 0x1
cpu MHz : 3599.998
cache size : 15360 KB
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp : yes
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss syscall nx pdpe1gb rdtscp lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon rep_good nopl xtopology pni pclmulqdq ssse3 fma cx16 pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic movbe popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx f16c rdrand hypervisor lahf_lm abm 3dnowprefetch arat xsaveopt fsgsbase smep erms
bogomips : 7199.99
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

Here is a hardware benchmark and some network benchmarking but I don’t like the small amount of network testing available in this script because you could reasonably assume that it’s not an optimal connection when it’s not exactly a comprehensive network test of multiple sources where you’d download 10 or more test files for more data.

-------------------------------------------------
 nench.sh v2018.04.14 -- https://git.io/nench.sh
 benchmark timestamp:    2018-11-16 16:57:53 UTC
-------------------------------------------------

Processor:    Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-1650 v4 @ 3.60GHz
CPU cores:    2
Frequency:    3599.998 MHz
RAM:          496M
Swap:         1.0G
Kernel:       Linux 3.2.0-4-amd64 x86_64

Disks:
sda     20G  HDD

CPU: SHA256-hashing 500 MB
    2.225 seconds
CPU: bzip2-compressing 500 MB
    4.057 seconds
CPU: AES-encrypting 500 MB
    1.081 seconds

ioping: seek rate
    min/avg/max/mdev = 144.6 us / 158.4 us / 982.3 us / 23.7 us
ioping: sequential read speed
    generated 20.2 k requests in 5.00 s, 4.94 GiB, 4.05 k iops, 1012.0 MiB/s

dd: sequential write speed
    1st run:    287.06 MiB/s
    2nd run:    286.10 MiB/s
    3rd run:    276.57 MiB/s
    average:    283.24 MiB/s

IPv4 speedtests
    your IPv4:    103.195.102.xxxx

    Cachefly CDN:         103.93 MiB/s
    Leaseweb (NL):        2.12 MiB/s
    Softlayer DAL (US):   0.00 MiB/s
    Online.net (FR):      2.13 MiB/s
    OVH BHS (CA):         5.52 MiB/s

IPv6 speedtests
    your IPv6:    2605:9880:400:xxxx

    Leaseweb (NL):        2.04 MiB/s
    Softlayer DAL (US):   0.00 MiB/s
    Online.net (FR):      2.15 MiB/s
    OVH BHS (CA):         5.42 MiB/s
-------------------------------------------------

For example, when I use bench.sh instead of nench.sh

# wget -qO- bench.sh | bash
----------------------------------------------------------------------
CPU model            : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-1650 v4 @ 3.60GHz
Number of cores      : 2
CPU frequency        : 3599.998 MHz
Total size of Disk   : 38.0 GB (2.6 GB Used)
Total amount of Mem  : 496 MB (74 MB Used)
Total amount of Swap : 1022 MB (0 MB Used)
System uptime        : 0 days, 15 hour 25 min
Load average         : 0.03, 0.10, 0.04
OS                   : Debian GNU/Linux 7
Arch                 : x86_64 (64 Bit)
Kernel               : 3.2.0-4-amd64
----------------------------------------------------------------------
I/O speed(1st run)   : 285 MB/s
I/O speed(2nd run)   : 271 MB/s
I/O speed(3rd run)   : 277 MB/s
Average I/O speed    : 277.7 MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Node Name                       IPv4 address            Download Speed
CacheFly                        205.234.175.175         111MB/s
Linode, Tokyo, JP               106.187.96.148          1.43MB/s
Linode, Singapore, SG           139.162.23.4            942KB/s
Linode, London, UK              176.58.107.39           245KB/s
Linode, Frankfurt, DE           139.162.130.8           2.01MB/s
Linode, Fremont, CA             50.116.14.9             2.22MB/s
Softlayer, Dallas, TX           173.192.68.18           7.63MB/s
Softlayer, Seattle, WA          67.228.112.250          3.38MB/s
Softlayer, Frankfurt, DE        159.122.69.4            2.07MB/s
Softlayer, Singapore, SG        119.81.28.170           907KB/s
Softlayer, HongKong, CN         119.81.130.170          1.00MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Node Name                       IPv6 address            Download Speed
Linode, Atlanta, GA             2600:3c02::4b           11.8MB/s
Linode, Dallas, TX              2600:3c00::4b           7.22MB/s
Linode, Newark, NJ              2600:3c03::4b           6.47MB/s
Linode, Singapore, SG           2400:8901::4b           1007KB/s
Linode, Tokyo, JP               2400:8900::4b           1.31MB/s
Softlayer, San Jose, CA         2607:f0d0:2601:2a::4    3.26MB/s
Softlayer, Washington, WA       2607:f0d0:3001:78::2    7.02MB/s
Softlayer, Paris, FR            2a03:8180:1301:8::4     1.72MB/s
Softlayer, Singapore, SG        2401:c900:1101:8::2     975KB/s
Softlayer, Tokyo, JP            2401:c900:1001:16::4    1.39MB/s
----------------------------------------------------------------------

I know in some examples its not looking good but nothing against this company but Miami is a location where you deploy in Miami if Miami is a requirement for Florida or Southeast US users. I know in Florida, three points where traffic come in and out of the state are in Jacksonville, Orlando and Miami where even in Jacksonville traffic can be routed down to Miami then back up to Atlanta.

Another group of users is Central and South America because Brazil has good connectivity to Miami due to underwater fiber optic connections. But your users in Central or West US aren’t going to have the exact best connectivity to the very very end of the southern tip of Florida.

Conclusion

So far so good with Big Power Hosting.

I opened up a ticket with the sales department asking about a particular type of VPS hosting plan that is becoming popular. Brian and Jason have been keeping me updated about it and once they have more information, which supposedly is supposed to happen this weekend, I will post it on here.

Yes VPSLIST Is Actually Back

I know it’s been a long time since I’ve posted but one of the original VPS review pages, VPSLIST, is coming back.

For those who may never remember, I was reviewing back when Low End Box was mostly focused on showing offers. People left their reviews in the comments, but nobody was really reviewing.

96mb.com was “reviewing” but it was just a weird system and layout. It was very angry, moody LowEndTalk style reviewing. Now I see that site is completely gone and hasn’t posted for years.

Low End Box was sold off from the original Low End Admin to a guy named “Chief” who did some shady stuff and ultimately did what everybody would predicted -flipped/sold the site to a commercial interest thus tainting the whole “community” that was built because it would just get cheesy like WebHostingTalk, which right now is exactly what is going on.

That interest later on ended up being “VSNX”, ultimately ColoCrossing, and all their hilarious drama and trolling on Low End Talk.

Now, Low End Box is absolutely sad. It’s all ColoCrossing resellers slickly posted with nothing intriguing, nothing innovative, almost seems like part of a marketing plan for resellers to get orders and exposure without any sales or marketing people on the reseller’s team. Just sign up for ColoCrossing and we’ll manage your servers, manage your marketing, and you just sit back.

Slick but can’t blame them. But customers need to be smarter than just slick marketing.

I will have some reviews that I can post once I figure out a new system of review for the site relaunch. I plan on an official launch on the January 1st 2019 so stay tuned for that and I’ll be regularly posting up until the official launch.

I’ve taken a career change over the past few years and it’s taken me away from doing technical work for a living. However it’s given me the break I needed when you do any kind of technical work, you have the problem of being burned out. I was burned out running this full-time and trying to find sysadmin work, then when I found sysadmin work I didn’t feel like keeping this updated.

Now I have a very predictable schedule with regular time off and vacations, like the vacation I’m enjoying right now for the next twelve days.

I just fired up a LibreNMS installation on Scaleway and have plans to regular post about it.

I find that Scaleway is best suited for LibreNMS’s resource demands and network utilization where you *may* get away with it on a lower end OpenVZ yearly offer but as any OpenVZ user knows, noisy neighbor syndrome happens when that node fills up and all the sudden your SQL load or resource intensiveness is being flagged as resource abuse.

VPSLIST was launched on Christmas 2010, so it always seems to be relaunched, tweaked or adjusted around Christmas time.

I find it interesting that the race to the bottom that Low End Box started with the $7/mo and less target, which I have nothing against, is now a race of being unsustainable with thin margins against a highly competitive market but also a market where a reseller might only last 1 – 3 years if not keep things running for 3 – 6 months.

Sadly I’m seeing the proof of this with the ridiculous offers on one, two and three year hosting offers with a company barely established that long. Are they using prepaid annual plans as fundraising for expansion and operation?

So you might ask, what am I using right now?

  • OVH dedicated server at BHS, the past 3 years.
  • Scaleway.
  • Vultr.
  • A handful of “low end” providers for semi-production stuff.

For projects where I need a competitive price, features and the availability of IP addresses – OVH is king. You can’t compete against them unless for some unforeseeable reason they start raising prices dramatically without giving value to the customer.

Scaleway is my favorite middle ground where I need more resources than a VPS but not to the point of a dedicated server.

Vultr works perfect for me for pricing on testing something and also something in semi-production, like a mail server, for my projects.

I don’t name my handful of low end providers for now but they’re no strangers to the name game if you follow the hosting industry, specifically VPS hosting and the low end market. Some are names you’ve probably used, some are names you’ve thought about using but don’t have reviews of and some you’ve probably never heard of because they’re humming along just fine with minimal marketing or trying to race to the bottom.

So stay tuned and again, my apologies for sorta walking away but at that point in your life you sometimes need to take a break, analyze your life and see what you need to do. I just needed to take a break from managing sites.

HostUS One Year Review

I’ve been a customer for over a year with HostUS and currently have five active 768mb OpenVZ services with them.

Let me go ahead and say that I’m absolutely 100% satisfied with their services over the past year.

I use 3 of those 5 services for a cPanel DNS Only cluster which has worked absolutely great. This cluster is used for my primary cPanel server for my customers. If I had any issues with the cluster, it would impact my customers and my websites which it did not.

Continue reading “HostUS One Year Review”